FESTIVALS AND LEGENDS ON THE EDGE OF TITICACA LAKE

 

Located on the Andean plateau of Peru, the Puno region is dominated by Lake Titicaca, sacred place of the Incas and home to natural and artificial islands. Puno’s churches are characterized by their distinctive colonial architecture. Its inhabitants are proud of their Quechua and Aymara past, and their folkloric tradition that can be seen every year in the form of dances and rituals during the Candelaria festival. Puno is a legend, a multicolored festival, and home to natural and artificial islands.

FLOATING ISLANDS UROS, AMANTANI & TAQUILE

 

The Uros Islands there are more than 80 islands, each inhabited by Uro-Aymara families who build floating houses out of reed mats on Lake Titicaca (12,500 feet above sea level). 

The Amantani island is divided into ten villages dedicated specifically to the growing of potatoes, corn, oca, quinoa, broad beans and peas, while typical handicrafts of the area are textiles and stone carvings. It stretches across an area of 9.28 km2 (3,817 masl).

The Taquile islands. The area is known for its friendly people, who still preserve traditional customs and clothes. Among the highlights are the laboriously crafted, fine textiles with symmetric and symbolic patterns, with strong colours that reflect Andean customs and beliefs. It is around 5.72 km2 in size.

SILLUSTANI ARCHEOLOGICAL COMPLEX

 

Among the many destinations, there are pre-Hispanic archaeological sites with circular constructions that still go by their original name of “chullpas”.

Located on the shores of the Umayo lagoon. Famous for its chullpas, great circular towers built to store the funeral remains of leading authorities for the ancient inhabitants of Collao. Some reach up to 12 metres high, and their bases are smaller than the top sections. The Site Museum, which holds various items from the Colla, Tiahuanaco and Inca Civilizations, is located just a short distance away.